About Us

The Planetary Association for Clean Energy (PACE) is a non-profit, charitable corporation whose objects are to facilitate the discovery, research, development, demonstration and evaluation of clean energy systems. PACE is an NGO Special Consultative status with the Economic and Social council of the United Nations (ECOSOC).

History

PACE was founded in June 1975 in Ottawa, Canada, under the guidance of the Hon. Senator Chesley W. Carter, then Chair-person of the Senate’s Standing Committee on Health, Welfare and Science as well as member of the Senate Special Committee on Science Policy. With the Hon. Carter, a number of scientists undertook to make use of this Association to develop an international interdisciplinary network of advanced scientific thinking individuals and organizations. Together, these were to promote and steward “clean energy systems” for eventual implementation on a planetary-wide scale.

Clean energy systems are defined as those which draw on natural supply, which are universal in application, which are inexpensive and which do not cause polluting residue.

Already in 1976 such systems were being examined and promoted by the founders of the Association.

This initial nucleus of scientists grew. In 1979, the Association became incorporated as a Canadian non-profit corporation. Its Federal Charter foresaw the role of facilitation of the discovery, research, development, demonstration and evaluation of clean energy systems. Another role cited is stewarding the planning, co-ordination and implementation of clean energy systems on planetary, continental, regional, local and individual scales. Experience has enjoined the network to act responsibly by serving as a monitor and an alert system for emerging “unclean” systems not considered by other groups.

In 1980, the Association became a Learned Society and hosted its first sessions as such at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Its network currently comprises about 3,600 individuals and institutions in over 60 nations. Its official publication is the Newsletter. Since 1981, books, proceedings, monographs and electronic publications have been released to both general and specialist audiences.

In 1986, the Learned Society initiated sustained efforts towards international technological transfer through a Symposium & exhibition in Hull, Québec, followed by a 1989 presentation at the United Nations, where it is recognized as an Associate NGO.

In 1990, the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Research on Environment and Economy has conferred an associative status to the Society.

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